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architecture, digital, history, Mallee

in the Wimmera-Mallee

November 20, 2016

I struggled with my  photography on  the recent phototrip to the Wimmera-Mallee  for the Mallee Routes project I am working on  with Eric Algra and Gilbert Roe.   Though it  involved slow travelling as a way of making sense of a changing world, my method of working –scoping scenes with a digital camera,  then re-photographing with film cameras at a latter date—quickly hit its limits.

I was there on the cusp of summer.  It  was hot and dry and  the light was very bright, intense and contrasty. I could only work very early in the morning after sunrise and in the early evening for a very short period of time. The  exploring and scoping  of material was during the heat of  the day the distances involved in travelling from town  to town—about 50 km– meant that it was not feasible for me to return to what I had previously sketched in the brief  period of time  that I was there.

Memorial Hall, Hopetoun

Memorial Hall, Hopetoun

We camped at the Mallee Bush Retreat  on the foreshore of Lake Lascelles in Hopetoun,  and  I mostly photographed around this regional town. This image of the Memorial Hall was made around  8pm on the last night. We had just come out of the pub and I saw the soft light on the building’s facade.   I quickly  scoped it,  but  I had no time to re-photograph it with my 5×4 Linhof before the gentle  light disappeared. What I have is a photographic document  in the form of a digital file.

In our  culture of computer-pictures--our society of information is a society of pictures—it is held that with  the emergence of computer-generated imagery  the very foundation and status of the photographic document is challenged due to the profound undermining of photography’s status as an inherently truthful pictorial form.It is true that  digital nature of the image has challenged the essential qualities of analogue photography: its evidential nature, and the identification as a form of visual truth.  It is also true that  representing the world through a camera lens is giving way to new forms of vision and  image with  the new  digital image technologies associated with  the computer.

This image is no deadpan documentation; nor a mummified effigy that is properly housed in a museum; nor  a fading memory in a post-photographic culture of what photography once was. Looking at this  particular photographic file  on my computer screen is to look at the past: this  photograph gives me a particular recollection of an experience and it gives me something  to hold onto about he Mallee’s history.    Continue Reading…

history, Indigenous, landscape, people, roadtrip

on the road to Lajamanu

October 9, 2016

The three exhibitions that I have been involved in  —Weltraum, Abstractions x5 and Mallee Routes— are  over.

Tomorrow morning I drive to Mildura via the Mallee Highway  to link up with Judith Crispin and friends who are travelling from Sydney to  Lajamanu in the North Tanami Desert  in the Northern Territory of Australia.  It will take us approximately 3 days  to get to Lajamanu via Alice Springs from Mildura.We will  travel on  the Goyder Highway to Port Augusta, and then on the Stuart Highway to Alice Springs. I haven’t been on the Woomera –Alice Springs section  of the Stuart Highway before, so this is new terrain for me.

In Alice Springs we  will meet up  with other photographers–Juno Gemes and Helga Leunig–and a poet–Dave Musgrave, who runs Puncher and Wattmann, an independent Australian publishing house that publishes Australian poetry and literary fiction. The third  day is then spent traveling in two 4 wheel drive vehicles  on the Tanami Road  to  the turnoff to Lajamanu, then along the Lajamanu track to the community based on the eastern side of Hooker Creek.  There is some background  on Lajamanu here and here. 

on the road

on the road

We are going to  see the Milpirri Festival, which  is presented by the Warlpiri people at Lajamanu in association with the Tracks Dance Company.  For one night only, every two years, Milpirri brings the whole Lajamanu community together in a  theatrical performance in Lajamanu itself. Milpirri began in 2005 and it is based upon a twenty-seven-year relationship between Tracks Dance Company and Lajamanu community that began in 1988.

Milpirri challenges the  narrative of  the Australian nation state that Indigenous societies embrace modernity (‘Close the Gap’) by leaving their homelands to gainfully ‘participate’ in the nation.  In this  narrative  the ‘remote’ is increasingly figured as disadvantageous, as well as unhealthy, for sustainable and productive lives to take shape.  The conservatives say that  these remote communities need to be, and should be,  shut down. The conservative’s  default position is assimilation.   Continue Reading…

architecture, colour, history, Mallee, roadtrip

Weltraum outtake

August 14, 2016

This  35mm outtake is one of the exploratory  pictures that I made whilst I was working out how to approach  photographing the 15 silos on the Mallee Highway project. Several work in progress images from this series  form my contribution to the Weltraum exhibition at Magpie Springs  in the 2016 Shimmer Photographic Biennale.

The location of the picture is Murrayville in  the Victorian Mallee,  and I was photographing all the silos on the Mallee Highway whilst making my way to the camp at Ouyen with Gilbert Roe.  I made notes as photographed each silo along the way as to side of the silo provided the best perspective and whether am or pm  was the most suitable time.

Murrayville

Murrayville

The options that I had were: should I stand well back from the silo and make it part of the landscape rather than focus on the silo itself;  should I use backlight to give the landscape a gloomy atmosphere; should I use colour or black and white film; what camera would I use? I decided that I would focus on the silo, use frontal light,  work in black and white,  and photograph  with  the Cambo 8 x10 monorail.

In the light of this straight-on gaze of the large format camera  the  photographic approach of the above 35mm  outtake is sidelined to  become a part of the Mallee Project. Continue Reading…

architecture, critical writing, history

Siegfried Kracauer on photography

July 10, 2016

In his    early writings  (that is, his feuilletons written during the 1920’s and 1930s) in Germany, Siegfried Kracauer explored the cultural landscape of industrial capitalism in the early 20th century. The feuilletons, which were  eventually collected into two books—The  Ornament of the Masses and Streets of Berlin and Elsewhere—- decoded the surface phenomena of modernity as complex historical ciphers—surfaces subject to interpretation.  These  were interpreted as symptoms of  larger sociopolitical developments, such as  the evacuation of meaning in the daily life and  the popular culture of  modernity. These writings are a form of cultural criticism in the business of theorizing the present.

Adelaide CBD, 2.20pm

Adelaide CBD, 2.20pm

The underlying  argument  in these writings  has its roots in Nietzsche, Weber and Lukas. History in modernity was seen as a process  of disenchantment (demythologising) and a crisis emerged during this process because modern rationality was yoked to capitalist relations of production,  becomes an abstract rationality  that mythologizes the relations of production in industrial capitalism and the conditions of life that result from them as  if they were unchanging nature. Contemporary actuality turns out to be shadowy and insubstantial, a chaos without soul or meaning, whose absurdity can only be represented in a distorted image. We are isolated and homeless, suspended in a void, and stifled by the law-like regularities of a reality we ourselves have created which is fundamentally alien to meaning. Ours is a world fused by the absence of truth, plunged into a state of angst.

The essays or feuilletons map the return of myth across a wide spectrum of high and popular culture in the Weimar Republic. The inconspicuous, quotidian expressions of a culture reveal more about it than its own self-pronouncements. Everyday phenomena such as photos or the nature of popular literature and film are unmediated representations of a culture.  As part of this Kracauer  explored the relationship between visual culture,  art, photography and modernity in the essays such as The Mass Ornament and  On Photography   The photograph for  Kracauer, as for Georg Simmel, captures a true likeness, a faithful representation, a simple copy of figures, objects and scenes.   Photography’s  strength is that it  captures the actual appearances of people and the surfaces of things  but  its weakness is its failure to penetrate beneath these exterior manifestations.  So the photograph is hollow,  empty and mechanical. Without a supporting history or a memory that is associated with the subject matter photography is  not adequate to recreate an understanding of the event. Continue Reading…

colour, digital, history, landscape, ruins, topographics

at Lake Albert

April 10, 2016

After attending  the Centre of  Culture,  Land and Sea’s   informative workshop at Meningie in South Australia.  I used the opportunity  to explore around  Lake Albert and the Narrung Peninsula with its legacy of settler agriculture before driving on  down to Salt Creek  for a photoshoot for the Edgelands project.

Lake Albert, along with Lake Alexandrina,   is a part of the Lower Lakes of the River Murray,  and  is adjacent to the northern lagoon’s eco-system of the Coorong. Being at the bottom end of the highly engineered River Murray,  Lake Albert  suffers from the river’s  minimal environmental flows.  Those at the  terminus of the River Murray receive what is left over after consumptive use in the Murray-Darling Basin.

 Though  the  Barrages at Goolwa were constructed to maintain the Lakes as freshwater systems at a constant water depth, the Lakes/Coorong region is  at the end of a major river systems, which  means that this region is highly sensitive to changes in freshwater flows. Despite the Basin Plan, which has addressed the overallocation of water  from the Basin’s rivers  by irrigated agriculture,  not enough fresh water currently flows into Lake Albert  to flush the lake  out,  so it is salty,  and all the  contaminants from the upper part of the river end up in Lake Albert.
Lake Albert, South Australia

Lake Albert, South Australia

The irrigators around  Lake Albert suffered from a lack of water during the Millennium Drought (from 2002- 2010)—-when Lake Albert was closed off from natural river flows by a Government constructed band at the entrance top the Lake.   Exposure and oxidation of acid sulfate soils due to falling water levels from 2007-2009 in the Lower River Murray and Lower Lakes also resulted in acidification of soils, lake and ground water. The low water levels on Lake Albert  resulted in many of the dairy farmers, who had  relied on pumped water from Lake Albert,   being  forced to sell their cattle and even abandon their dairy farms. Continue Reading…